Just Andy

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Was a sad day today...

Posted by andyreohorn on October 2, 2007 at 7:49 PM Comments comments (2)
... my pride and joy with 2 wheels departed to a new home.

After 2 years with me and all of 2500 miles, I decided that I am getting so little use out of her, that the money would be better spent settling the finance and paying off a bit more of the Bulldog debt!


I am, of course, talking about my Triumph Daytona. I have owned a fair few bikes now and this one takes the prize as the best handling and the best looking of the lot. Not the fastest (the ZZR1100 holds that one), nor the cheapest (my first bike, a Suzuki GT125 holds that one!), but a bike that made you want to lean that little bit further, twist the throttle that little bit harder, admire yourself in passing shop windows that little more often.

GX05 TEY, I shall miss you, even if it is only drooling over you in my garage...


It's official

Posted by andyreohorn on September 21, 2007 at 11:18 PM Comments comments (4)
After 12 months of not smoking and avoiding the temptation of the dreaded weed, the medical profession views you as a NON SMOKER.

So as of today I am a non smoker - hoorah! It's official 

I am actually well proud of myself.

For the record, my last cigarette was 10.30am on 20th September 2006.

A year on, fitter, happier and hopefully due to live longer 

RIP Brian Brown - Shoreham 2007

Posted by andyreohorn on September 16, 2007 at 7:28 PM Comments comments (0)
I think the pictures say it all.

I was lucky enough to exchange a few words with him as we put our respective aircraft to bed. His smile was truly from the heart.









Edinburgh for coffee

Posted by andyreohorn on August 26, 2007 at 5:12 PM Comments comments (2)
New adventure published on the website. Link on the left or http://www.justandy.co.uk/edinburghforcoffee.htm

Enjoy. I know I did.

Anything but straight and level

Posted by andyreohorn on July 1, 2007 at 5:30 PM Comments comments (0)
What a fantastic day that has been!

An unashamed lack of straight and level flight, nearly ?50 in landing fees and an eye watering 171 litres of fuel means that the first 4 hours are on our new engine in the Dawg.

We sat looking forlornly at the sky this morning at Shoreham for the second morning in a row as the grey clouds raced each other across the sky at lower than circuit height.

We decided if nothing else, to fill the tanks. Whilst we were doing so the skies lightened considerably and the very occasional patch of blue started to appear.

Donning headsets, we lined up on the runway, eyes searching for anything amiss. Although I had flown the initial test flight with our engineer a couple of days beforehand, this time we were on our own. Everything in the green, airspeed alive and we are airborne, heading along the coast toward Lydd.

Trouble is, trying to fly a Dawg in a straight line is as difficult as flying a Chippy in a straight line. It is ethically not correct, the grin factor too intense to sit there just boring a tunnel through the air the shape of a long straw. Mazes are far more interesting to follow, so if anyone was looking at our radar trace, do tell us if we made any interesting shapes!

An hour later (usually a 25 minute flight) we arrived at Lydd. Wow!! How posh it has become. Leather sofas, flight briefing facilities and a pilot briefing room. Of course, the girls on the reception desk are as attractive as always  :P

The queue for the carvery was far too long, so we enjoyed a cup of tea with some other reprobates from Shoreham, before heading off, this time to the north and with Mad Dog 3 flying.

Sure enough, he had the same problem as me. Straight and level was just out of the question   :twisted:

We admired Ashford and Canterbury from the air, before heading up to St Mary's Marsh, dodging a very large shower to arrive in Southend's overhead (with their permission of course) and then onto Colchester. The scenery as you cross the Thames is immediately different, great seen from 60 degree angles!!

As another hour airborne came closer we were given a right base join behind a Cessna, as Mad Dog 3 piloted us to a respectable first landing under my apparently critical eye   :shifty:

Much to our horror, we found that the cafe was just closing. Do Essex people not go out on Sunday afternoon? Contenting ourselves with another cup of tea and a prebaked cake,we were soon off again, heading south.

Passing over Brands Hatch we tuned into Biggin to find we were alone on frequency. High hopes of a Gatwick transit, we quickly said our goodbyes at Kenley and asked for a transit over Gatwick's 26 threshold.

For the first time we were refused outright, with no 'standby I'll check'; something to do with Glasgow yesterday I wonder? After much confusion as to what type we were flying, and was it a rotary or fixed wing, we were given Dorking to Horsham west of the A24 not above 1500' which we duly accepted. The turbulence over the North Downs was sporting and I amused myself with following the A24 southbound. Every bend of it   :compress:

After a quick aerial hello to a friend having cleared Gatwick zone, we quickly sneaked up on top...

Oh the fun of beating up the clouds, stall warner bleating like a new born lamb as we flew ever tightening circles around the towers of cumulus, dipping a wing in here, slicing the top off a cloud here, playing formation with our shadow, outlined as it was in a halo against the soft cotton wool clouds.

Down through the gaps, up cloud sided valleys, swooping over the tops to turn up the next valley, round to the left, round to the right, oh this is fun, so much fun...

The appearance of a small streak of oil on the cowling made our minds up it was time for home and we danced with the tops til we slid down their slopes to a beautifully tight circuit to kiss the tarmac again.

A beautiful day. The fun we have had is immense. When the engine's run in and we can push it some more, it is going to be better than being let loose in a sweet shop.

Yes the past few months has been expensive, yes it has been heartbreaking. It takes a day like today to realise why we put up with all that. A day chasing clouds, formating on your own shadow, dancing, playing, grinning.

Thanks Mad Dog 3 for being there to share it.

Anything but straight and level

Posted by andyreohorn on July 1, 2007 at 5:30 PM Comments comments (0)
What a fantastic day that has been!

An unashamed lack of straight and level flight, nearly ?50 in landing fees and an eye watering 171 litres of fuel means that the first 4 hours are on our new engine in the Dawg.

We sat looking forlornly at the sky this morning at Shoreham for the second morning in a row as the grey clouds raced each other across the sky at lower than circuit height.

We decided if nothing else, to fill the tanks. Whilst we were doing so the skies lightened considerably and the very occasional patch of blue started to appear.

Donning headsets, we lined up on the runway, eyes searching for anything amiss. Although I had flown the initial test flight with our engineer a couple of days beforehand, this time we were on our own. Everything in the green, airspeed alive and we are airborne, heading along the coast toward Lydd.

Trouble is, trying to fly a Dawg in a straight line is as difficult as flying a Chippy in a straight line. It is ethically not correct, the grin factor too intense to sit there just boring a tunnel through the air the shape of a long straw. Mazes are far more interesting to follow, so if anyone was looking at our radar trace, do tell us if we made any interesting shapes!

An hour later (usually a 25 minute flight) we arrived at Lydd. Wow!! How posh it has become. Leather sofas, flight briefing facilities and a pilot briefing room. Of course, the girls on the reception desk are as attractive as always  :P

The queue for the carvery was far too long, so we enjoyed a cup of tea with some other reprobates from Shoreham, before heading off, this time to the north and with Mad Dog 3 flying.

Sure enough, he had the same problem as me. Straight and level was just out of the question   :twisted:

We admired Ashford and Canterbury from the air, before heading up to St Mary's Marsh, dodging a very large shower to arrive in Southend's overhead (with their permission of course) and then onto Colchester. The scenery as you cross the Thames is immediately different, great seen from 60 degree angles!!

As another hour airborne came closer we were given a right base join behind a Cessna, as Mad Dog 3 piloted us to a respectable first landing under my apparently critical eye   :shifty:

Much to our horror, we found that the cafe was just closing. Do Essex people not go out on Sunday afternoon? Contenting ourselves with another cup of tea and a prebaked cake,we were soon off again, heading south.

Passing over Brands Hatch we tuned into Biggin to find we were alone on frequency. High hopes of a Gatwick transit, we quickly said our goodbyes at Kenley and asked for a transit over Gatwick's 26 threshold.

For the first time we were refused outright, with no 'standby I'll check'; something to do with Glasgow yesterday I wonder? After much confusion as to what type we were flying, and was it a rotary or fixed wing, we were given Dorking to Horsham west of the A24 not above 1500' which we duly accepted. The turbulence over the North Downs was sporting and I amused myself with following the A24 southbound. Every bend of it   :compress:

After a quick aerial hello to a friend having cleared Gatwick zone, we quickly sneaked up on top...

Oh the fun of beating up the clouds, stall warner bleating like a new born lamb as we flew ever tightening circles around the towers of cumulus, dipping a wing in here, slicing the top off a cloud here, playing formation with our shadow, outlined as it was in a halo against the soft cotton wool clouds.

Down through the gaps, up cloud sided valleys, swooping over the tops to turn up the next valley, round to the left, round to the right, oh this is fun, so much fun...

The appearance of a small streak of oil on the cowling made our minds up it was time for home and we danced with the tops til we slid down their slopes to a beautifully tight circuit to kiss the tarmac again.

A beautiful day. The fun we have had is immense. When the engine's run in and we can push it some more, it is going to be better than being let loose in a sweet shop.

Yes the past few months has been expensive, yes it has been heartbreaking. It takes a day like today to realise why we put up with all that. A day chasing clouds, formating on your own shadow, dancing, playing, grinning.

Thanks Mad Dog 3 for being there to share it.

Anything but straight and level

Posted by andyreohorn on July 1, 2007 at 5:30 PM Comments comments (0)
What a fantastic day that has been!

An unashamed lack of straight and level flight, nearly ?50 in landing fees and an eye watering 171 litres of fuel means that the first 4 hours are on our new engine in the Dawg.

We sat looking forlornly at the sky this morning at Shoreham for the second morning in a row as the grey clouds raced each other across the sky at lower than circuit height.

We decided if nothing else, to fill the tanks. Whilst we were doing so the skies lightened considerably and the very occasional patch of blue started to appear.

Donning headsets, we lined up on the runway, eyes searching for anything amiss. Although I had flown the initial test flight with our engineer a couple of days beforehand, this time we were on our own. Everything in the green, airspeed alive and we are airborne, heading along the coast toward Lydd.

Trouble is, trying to fly a Dawg in a straight line is as difficult as flying a Chippy in a straight line. It is ethically not correct, the grin factor too intense to sit there just boring a tunnel through the air the shape of a long straw. Mazes are far more interesting to follow, so if anyone was looking at our radar trace, do tell us if we made any interesting shapes!

An hour later (usually a 25 minute flight) we arrived at Lydd. Wow!! How posh it has become. Leather sofas, flight briefing facilities and a pilot briefing room. Of course, the girls on the reception desk are as attractive as always  :P

The queue for the carvery was far too long, so we enjoyed a cup of tea with some other reprobates from Shoreham, before heading off, this time to the north and with Mad Dog 3 flying.

Sure enough, he had the same problem as me. Straight and level was just out of the question   :twisted:

We admired Ashford and Canterbury from the air, before heading up to St Mary's Marsh, dodging a very large shower to arrive in Southend's overhead (with their permission of course) and then onto Colchester. The scenery as you cross the Thames is immediately different, great seen from 60 degree angles!!

As another hour airborne came closer we were given a right base join behind a Cessna, as Mad Dog 3 piloted us to a respectable first landing under my apparently critical eye   :shifty:

Much to our horror, we found that the cafe was just closing. Do Essex people not go out on Sunday afternoon? Contenting ourselves with another cup of tea and a prebaked cake,we were soon off again, heading south.

Passing over Brands Hatch we tuned into Biggin to find we were alone on frequency. High hopes of a Gatwick transit, we quickly said our goodbyes at Kenley and asked for a transit over Gatwick's 26 threshold.

For the first time we were refused outright, with no 'standby I'll check'; something to do with Glasgow yesterday I wonder? After much confusion as to what type we were flying, and was it a rotary or fixed wing, we were given Dorking to Horsham west of the A24 not above 1500' which we duly accepted. The turbulence over the North Downs was sporting and I amused myself with following the A24 southbound. Every bend of it   :compress:

After a quick aerial hello to a friend having cleared Gatwick zone, we quickly sneaked up on top...

Oh the fun of beating up the clouds, stall warner bleating like a new born lamb as we flew ever tightening circles around the towers of cumulus, dipping a wing in here, slicing the top off a cloud here, playing formation with our shadow, outlined as it was in a halo against the soft cotton wool clouds.

Down through the gaps, up cloud sided valleys, swooping over the tops to turn up the next valley, round to the left, round to the right, oh this is fun, so much fun...

The appearance of a small streak of oil on the cowling made our minds up it was time for home and we danced with the tops til we slid down their slopes to a beautifully tight circuit to kiss the tarmac again.

A beautiful day. The fun we have had is immense. When the engine's run in and we can push it some more, it is going to be better than being let loose in a sweet shop.

Yes the past few months has been expensive, yes it has been heartbreaking. It takes a day like today to realise why we put up with all that. A day chasing clouds, formating on your own shadow, dancing, playing, grinning.

Thanks Mad Dog 3 for being there to share it.

15 weeks and 4 days later

Posted by andyreohorn on June 29, 2007 at 6:06 PM Comments comments (1)
Our baby is back.

After a lot of poking around under the cowling, Simon (our engineer) took XX554 for a couple of ground runs and then pronounced her ready to fly.

He had graciously agreed to be up there with me on this, the very first flight, with the very new engine. The most dangerous time of all in a 'planes life, that first few hours.

We took off with a cloudbase of 800' and stayed in the overhead of the airfield for the first 5 minutes before deciding to head out west. Eyes on the gauges we look for fields, but they are not required.

We stay up there for an hour, Simon playing with the clouds and beating up his strip before we head back for a very tight right base join for Runway 25.

The look in the photo says it all really:


IMC in Jersey

Posted by andyreohorn on May 31, 2007 at 10:12 AM Comments comments (0)

After a long wait, I have finally put my piece about my IMC training and test in Jersey on the website.

 

It can be accessed here

 

I would advise putting the kettle on, making yourself a cuppa and then putting your feet up for a read.

 

Enjoy   

Old Buck

Posted by andyreohorn on May 27, 2007 at 5:32 AM Comments comments (3)
What an enjoyable day!

It has been a while since I added a new airfield to my logbook. After a casual comment from scud last weekend, we decided to go to Old Buckenham. Oft spoken about but I have never been there. The hay bales are so infamous it just had to be done.

PeteS
was unsure as to whether he could make it so I offered him a lift. It also meant I had the opportunity to put another infamous airfield in the logbook, London Knettishall International, the place where the Nobs and the Peasants are known to reside in different hangars.

I met with Keith (millermilla) and scud at Shoreham for an early morning coffee. Scud had dragged a couple of newcomers along for the ride, family members too!! They were going direct and we were going to drop into LKI and see if Pete still wanted a lift.

We made our way off into the murk, hoping it would improve as the day went on. As we neared the Thames it did indeed clear to a beautiful early summer day. For the first time I managed to spy Tilbury. It is rare for me to get up past Biggin in this direction, so spotting places was good fun today and made the both of us think.



We carried on a little further, successfully spotting Laindon, whilst wondering why Southend was so quiet.



The long silence on the radio was broken by Scud calling up from Detling. I decided to keep quiet and have a non radio trip up as far as I could. We passed Earls Colne and began a slow climb to 3400? passing in and out of fluffy cumulus clouds as we did so. The skyscape at times like these, are my favourite.



I had to give in and call Lakenheath as we were passing right through the CMATZ and they would always be useful for guiding us into the probably invisible LKI. The drawn out drawl of the American controller sounded at odds with the beautiful English countryside below us. Very rare to hear that in our local area.

As LKI hove into view, I remembered Pete?s instructions on avoiding the NIMBY houses, successfully negotiating them all.

LKI from the south:



The line of trees is a little disconcerting, but a lovely marker of the runway heading. Certainly makes one think hard about keeping straight on final!!

On base:



On long final:



And coming in to land with the billiard smooth grass beckoning:



What a welcome! We were marshalled in by Chief Grasscutter PeteS and shut down to the sound of the larks singing in the warm sunshine. This is a truly wonderful place. If I can ever find an airstrip to keep my aircraft on like this I will be a happy man. Pete took great pride in showing us around and we took the obligatory ?I wos ?ere? photos before we started up to leave.
Backtracking, we used every last inch of the runway. The TB10 is not the world?s greatest short field performer, but she was off by 2/3rds distance and we set course for Snetterton and Old Buck. A last minute runway change meant that the trip was 14 minutes rather than the initial 8 minutes.

Scud had been on the ground for a while now



We parked up and Pete, who had managed to use his group aircraft after all, followed us in



It was good to see The Kentish Fledgling sat at the table. The obligatory group photo?.



If there was ever proof that you should never ever believe a PROB99, Pianorak turned up unannounced and full of smiles, though I am not sure what he was boasting about here:




But then, another person arrived in his new aeroplane, G-LEAM, which was definitely on the gleamy side of shiny. Unfortunately Rupert was wearing very much the wrong colour trousers for what was to follow (they were white).



Surprise of the day though, was to be the silver and yellow Chippy that appeared through the murk that was now enveloping the field. Little did Rupert know that he really should not have worn white trousers?













And one I couldn?t resist, our resident AA man scratching his head?.what does this do then??



It was soon time to leave. PeteS headed off to Great Oakley, Pianorak back to White Waltham, Janie and Rupert headed off into the sun together, Scud and I prepared for our trip back to Shoreham and tKF waved goodbye:



The take off was interesting, entering cloud at 1000?, but as we headed south it cleared and we were soon back into bright sunshine again. OK, so it wasn?t the Jersey Fly In or the weekend at Quiberon, but it was a jolly good crack and had the most enjoyable of days. Good to see some faces I haven?t seen for quite a while too.

Oh yes, Pianorak ? good to know someone still wears the Class of 2004 t-shirts!!!


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